Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Wide range 10spd cassette

Our good friends over at IRD sent over this prototype Cassette for us to look at. So of course we're going to spill the beans to you guys. Is this a product they should produce?


This is the widest range 10 speed cassette I've ever seen. It's a 13-38. The first 5 cogs are chrome plated Cr-Mo. The 6 and 7 cogs sit on a separate aluminum spider. The 8 and 9 cogs are attached to another spider that is integrated with the 38t cog, which is alloy. This saves some weight and shouldn't affect durability since it won't incur very much wear.




If they make these they will probably retail for around $150.00. They should work with current Sram and Shimano 10 speed MTB drivetrains. They would also work with Shimano STI shifters mated to a 9spd Shimano MTB derailleur. I believe that Sram MTB rear derailleurs mate up fine with the double tap shifters. Could be a real boon for 1-10 drivetrains. Could be good for tandems and heavily loaded touring bikes as well. So what do you think? Should we get some of these?

For those of you who want to know the weight, you know who you are, shame on you. But we forgive you. It weighs in at just under 431 g. Happy now?

12 comments:

Invisible Hand said...

At the moment, I use a 12-32 IRD 10-speed cassette with a compact crank. A 13-38 -- even at $150 -- would save me bucks compared to a 46-30 subcompact crank.

Jon said...

First thought: "Damn, that's expensive." But I suppose it isn't so bad compared to similar cassettes (I'm thinking of Harris Cyclery's 13-34 9s @ $125). And it does beat putting on a new crank to achieve those low gears, especially for a bike that only occasionally does loaded tours.

Stephen said...

Sounds like a great idea to me, and would be handy for 2x10 on 29ers too. Could you post the intermediate cog sizes please - it'd be nice to know whether there are any horrible jumps in there.

Somacisco said...

13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 24, 27, 30, 34, 38. The roadies are having fits.

Cycle Drifter said...

Am I alone on this? I think IRD (or someone else) should bring back the mighty 8's! Perhaps something in line with Sheldon's custom touring cassette that is now discontinued. I, personally, wouldn't buy a 10 speed. I can only imagine the 38 being useful for truly loaded touring. Seems like 32 or 34 is the happy medium for touring applications. Why exactly is the industry phasing out 8-speed's? Is it because they last too long, and the companies want us coming back for more????

bmike said...

yes please.
would happily be added to my fargo, for when the 13-36 is not low enough. as when bike packing, with gear, on steep stuff.

imhousing said...

YES SELL IT NOW

Anonymous said...

Looks good, but I think Shimano makes 11-36 10-speed cassettes that retail for less than $100 and weigh less? I think 11-36 would pair better with compact cranksets, though 13-38 one might be good if you have a 52/39 though. Either would probably be good for a 1x10 "ten speed" if you get the right chainring. I want to try that.

Cleaveland Mountaineering said...

Low gears are fun, and they should make it, but personally 20x34 at 13,000 feet on a loaded bike is low enough for me - any slower and I'm pushing anyway.

Anonymous said...

11-38 would give u more range

Anonymous said...

I would love to have a 38T option for a 29er mountain bike. Paired with a 22T chain ring, this would be an awesome granny for climbing. Shimano seems to insist that the lowest we should need is a 36T-24T combination. This just isn't low enough for extended steep climbs.

ride more bikes said...

Did IRD ever end up making these cassettes?

I am looking for ideally an 11-38T but a 13-38T would still suffice. I'm trying to convert my wife's mountain bike to a rideable 1x10. Given she is on 165mm cranks, spiderless cranks are few and far between, so a 30T chainring is the smallest option.

30T up front coupled with a 13-38T could well be comfortable for her.